The Financial Times Takes on Finance and Politics in a Whole New Light: Engaging the Humourous Side of Life

Michael Gove: Speaking Out? Interesting. . . .

The front line of politics is where cagey Michael Gove is making an attempt at cashing-in. He has just come fresh out from that of leading his nation into Brexit; and did not make a very successful run of a coup with respect to the prime minister. The journalist likes to ride a slippery slope; and with that comes his opinions. Michael Gove has signed up with Chartwell Speakers. Chartwell Speakers works in accord with Michael as his agent, along with other notables such as Stephen Hawking, and Mitt Romney. Currently, the agency is singing praises about Michael’s ability to act as a guest speaker and expert to corporations. The agency suggests that Michael possesses an innate talent of offering engaging descriptions relative to the Referendum; and how life may appear—post-Brexit. The feat is really quite super-human, particularly since the prime minister, Theresa May, does not appear to be aware. The fees, which are usual for that of corporation speaking positions add a great loan deal, financially, to the salary of a journalist. All of the rest of us should wish for such favourable supplementation: monetarily. Gove may become the Editor, too, of the Sunday Times. Naturally, the agency was not in a position to quote pricing relative to a Gove audience. Regardless, any unfavourable elements are not included. There is a scarceness of fruit; and the cost is highly lofty, especially, since there are no fruit pickers.

Regulator’s Banquet News:

Metaphors flowed freely at the Mansion House’s annual Regulators’ Banquet. Andrew Bailey, the Leader of the Financial Conduct Authority was stylishly black-tied attired. Sam Woods of the Prudential Regulation Authority was in attendance too. Bailey, held the post of Woods’s new position. Woods made comment that Bailey may be the world of regulation’s Che Guevara. Naturally, Woods, assumed the role of just a humble on-looker. Bailey, shot back, making light of matters, by stating that at minimum, the job was a bit more secure than that of football manager.

Edi Truell: Swapping Shares

Equities First Holdings are taking the market by storm, where banks are tip-toeing lightly. The lender is in a position to lend money to prosperous investors, such as entrepreneurs, Rob Terry (Quindell) and Edi Truell (Tungsten) in exchange for shares. EFH’s initial transaction, inside of the United Kingdom was redeemed—at par. Andrew Newland, the leader of Angle plc, two years prior, made a transfer of 3.5m of his Angle shares to EFH—for 57p. He attained, in return, approximately £2m. Angle announced recently that Newland was in the repayment process of returning the cash to EFH, and re-purchasing shares. Terry of Quindell was not as fortunate. He noticed that his stock value fell, so he decided not to re-purchase shares. During the interim Truell, of Tungsten, transferred 6m to EFH this month for around £4m in cash. He is looking for favourable results.

Keiron Sparrowhawk: Metrics of Trump

A book: Cognitive Fitness for Business is relative to leadership. The author is Keiron Sparrowhawk. He runs, in addition, MyCognition, a brain training enterprise. The book measures a leader’s five key metrics, inclusive of executive functionality, memory, attention to the details, episode memory and processing expediency. Persons want to know about Donald Trump’s measurement. The author revealed Mr. Trump’s cognitive abilities were flawed, his decision-making ability was quite poor, and he does not realistically view the past.

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