Swimming Prosthetics Restores the Hope of Swimming to a War Veteran

People who have suffered accidents that claimed one of their limbs have always had a problem trying to adapt a new way of life. However, advancements in the technology have allowed people who have lost their legs to walk again with the help of prosthetics. Walking on land with the use of a prosthetic leg has been easy but navigating through water remains a challenge until March 2017. Northwell Health in collaboration with JWT New York worked together to create a swimming prosthetic for a veteran.

About Dan Lasko

Dan Lasko, a 34 years old former Marine had an explosion in Afghanistan that claimed the lower part of his left leg. Lasko who is a longtime triathlete is a father of two boys and currently, lives in Bethlehem Pennsylvania. Most amputees have a problem swimming since the prosthetic only acts as an anchor and not for propulsion. This was not different for Lasko until JWT brought the new waterproof prosthetic that provides both propulsion and support while swimming.

Features of the Prosthetics

This is the first prosthetic swim leg that propels the swimmer while swimming just like the original limb. Todd Goldstein is the designer of the amphibious prosthetic that allows the users to engage in both land and aquatic activities. On the sole of the prosthetic are a non-slip tread and a jet-black foot. One part of the leg features an upside down triangle of plastic and nylon that is located at calf height to allow proper propulsion. Additionally, the cone-shaped holes on the prosthetic allow water to pass through it preventing the device from overpowering the natural limb. Goldstein used a 3D printer to include some of these components and correct some issues on the prosthetic.

Conclusion

The triathlete has six different types of prosthetics for walking, cycling, sprinting, and one for high-impact exercise. The new swim leg now adds to the list of the seventh prosthetic on his special closet. The campaign that saw JWT and Northwell Health come together in the creation of the first fully functioning prosthetic aims at developing more prosthetics for people with amputated legs. The prosthetics will be available in the market at $2,000-$5,000 later in the year.

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